JMIR Public Health and Surveillance

A multidisciplinary journal that focuses on the intersection of public health and technology, public health informatics, mass media campaigns, surveillance, participatory epidemiology, and innovation in public health practice and research

Editor-in-Chief:

Travis Sanchez, DVM, MPH, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, USA


Impact Factor 8.5

JMIR Public Health & Surveillance (JPHS, Editor-in-chief: Travis Sanchez, Emory University/Rollins School of Public Health) is a top-ranked (Q1) Clarivate (SCIE, SSCI etc), ScopusPMC/PubMed-, MEDLINE-, CABI, and EBSCO/EBSCO essentials indexed, peer-reviewed international multidisciplinary journal with a unique focus on the intersection of innovation and technology in public health, and includes topics like public health informatics, surveillance (surveillance systems and rapid reports), participatory epidemiology, infodemiology and infoveillance, digital disease detection, digital epidemiology, electronic public health interventions, mass media/social media campaigns, health communication, and emerging population health analysis systems and tools. In June 2023, JPHS received an impact factor of 8.5.

JPHS has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

We publish regular articles, reviews, protocols/system descriptions and viewpoint papers on all aspects of public health, with a focus on innovation and technology in public health. The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

Apart from publishing traditional public health research and viewpoint papers as well as reports from traditional surveillance systems, JPH was one of the first (if not the only) peer-reviewed journals to publish papers with surveillance or pharmacovigilance data from non-traditional, unstructured big data and text sources such as social media and the Internet (infoveillance, digital disease detection), or reports on novel participatory epidemiology projects, where observations are solicited from the public.  

Among other innovations, JPHS is also dedicated to support rapid open data sharing and rapid open access to surveillance and outbreak data. As one of the novel features we plan to publish rapid or even real-time surveillance reports and open data. The methods and description of the surveillance system may be peer-reviewed and published only once in detail, in a  "baseline report" (in a JMIR Res Protoc or a JMIR Public Health & Surveill paper), and authors then have the possibility to publish data and reports in frequent intervals rapidly and with only minimal additional peer-review (we call this article type "Rapid Surveillance Reports"). JMIR Publications may even work with authors/researchers and developers of selected surveillance systems on APIs for semi-automated reports (e.g. weekly reports to be automatically published in JPHS and indexed in PubMed, based on data-feeds from surveillance systems and minimal narratives and abstracts).

Furthermore, during epidemics and public health emergencies, submissions with critical data will be processed with expedited peer-review to enable publication within days or even in real-time.

We also publish descriptions of open data resources and open source software. Where possible, we can and want to publish or even host the actual software or dataset on the journal website.

Recent Articles

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HIV/AIDS/STI Prevention and Care

Public health surveillance data are critical to understanding the current state of the HIV and AIDS epidemics. Surveillance data provide significant insight into patterns within and progress toward achieving targets for each of the steps in the HIV care continuum. Such targets include those outlined in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) goals. If these data are disseminated, they can be used to prioritize certain steps in the continuum, geographic locations, and groups of people.

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Infoveillance, Infodemiology, Digital Disease Surveillance, Infodemic Management

Despite the growing accessibility of web-based information related to spinal cord stimulation (SCS), the content and quality of commonly encountered websites remain unknown.

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Longitudinal and Cohort Studies in Public Health

In Italy, it has been difficult to accurately quantify hospital admissions of patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis using the Hospital Information System (HIS), mainly due to the heterogeneity of codes used in the hospital discharge records during different waves of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Cross-Sectional Studies in Public Health

Maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) is a known risk factor for offspring developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but the underlying mechanism remains unclear.

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Longitudinal and Cohort Studies in Public Health

The World Health Organization emphasizes the importance of completely voluntary blood donation to maintain safe and sustainable blood supplies. However, the benefits of blood donation for donors, such as reducing the risk of disease, remain a topic of debate due to the existence of the healthy donor effect (HDE). This effect arises because of inherent health differences between blood donors and the general population, and it is also considered a methodological issue.

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Cross-Sectional Studies in Public Health

Digital health literacy, also known as eHealth literacy, describes the ability to seek, find, understand, and apply health information from the internet to address health problems. The World Health Organization calls for actions to improve digital health literacy. To develop target group–specific digital health literacy interventions, it is necessary to know the digital health literacy of the general population and relevant subgroups.

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Infoveillance, Infodemiology, Digital Disease Surveillance, Infodemic Management

It is important for health organizations to communicate with the public through newspapers during health crises. Although hospitals were a main source of information for the public during the COVID-19 pandemic, little is known about how this information was presented to the public through (web-based) newspaper articles.

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Opioid and Related Substance Abuse Crisis

Opioids have traditionally been used to manage acute or terminal pain. However, their prolonged use has the potential for abuse, misuse, and addiction. South Korea introduced a new health care IT system named the Narcotics Information Management System (NIMS) with the objective of managing all aspects of opioid use, including manufacturing, distribution, sales, disposal, etc.

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Viewpoint and Opinions on Technology and Innovation in Public Health

Improving the environment is an important upstream intervention to promote population health by influencing health behaviors such as physical activity, smoking, and social distancing. Examples of promising environmental interventions include creating high-quality green spaces, building active transport infrastructure, and implementing urban planning regulations. However, there is little robust evidence to inform policy and decision makers about what kinds of environmental interventions are effective and for which populations. In this viewpoint, we make the case that this evidence gap exists partly because health behavior research is dominated by obtrusive methods that focus on studying individual behavior and that are less suitable for understanding environmental influences. In contrast, unobtrusive observation can assess how behavior varies in different environmental contexts. It thereby provides valuable data relating to how environments affect the behavior of populations, which is often useful knowledge for effectively and equitably tackling population health challenges such as obesity and noncommunicable diseases. Yet despite a long history, unobtrusive observation methods are currently underused in health behavior research. We discuss how developing the use of video technology and automated computer vision techniques can offer a scalable solution for assessing health behaviors, facilitating a more thorough investigation of how environments influence health behaviors. We also reflect on the important ethical challenges associated with unobtrusive observation and the use of these emerging video technologies. By increasing the use of unobtrusive observation alongside other methods, we strongly believe this will improve our understanding of the influences of the environment on health behaviors.

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Reviews on Public Health Technology and Innovation

Hypertension and diabetes are global health challenges requiring effective management to mitigate their considerable burden. The successful management of hypertension and diabetes requires the completion of a sequence of stages, which are collectively termed the care cascade.

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COVID-19 Vaccination

Racialized populations in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19. Higher vaccine hesitancy has been reported among racial and ethnic minorities in some of these countries. In the United Kingdom, for example, higher vaccine hesitancy has been observed among the South Asian population and Black compared with the White population, and this has been attributed to lack of trust in government due to historical and ongoing racism and discrimination.

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