JMIR Public Health and Surveillance

A multidisciplinary journal that focuses on the intersection of public health and technology, public health informatics, mass media campaigns, surveillance, participatory epidemiology, and innovation in public health practice and research

Editor-in-Chief:

Travis Sanchez, PhD, MPH, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, USA


Impact Factor 14.56

JMIR Public Health & Surveillance (JPHS, Editor-in-chief: Travis Sanchez, Emory University/Rollins School of Public Health) is a top-ranked (Q1) Clarivate (SCIE, SSCI etc), ScopusPMC/PubMed- and MEDLINE-indexed, peer-reviewed international multidisciplinary journal with a unique focus on the intersection of innovation and technology in public health, and includes topics like public health informatics, surveillance (surveillance systems and rapid reports), participatory epidemiology, infodemiology and infoveillance, digital disease detection, digital epidemiology, electronic public health interventions, mass media/social media campaigns, health communication, and emerging population health analysis systems and tools. In June 2022, JPHS received an impact factor of 14.56.

JPHS has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

We publish regular articles, reviews, protocols/system descriptions and viewpoint papers on all aspects of public health, with a focus on innovation and technology in public health. The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

Apart from publishing traditional public health research and viewpoint papers as well as reports from traditional surveillance systems, JPH was one of the first (if not the only) peer-reviewed journals to publish papers with surveillance or pharmacovigilance data from non-traditional, unstructured big data and text sources such as social media and the Internet (infoveillance, digital disease detection), or reports on novel participatory epidemiology projects, where observations are solicited from the public.  

Among other innovations, JPHS is also dedicated to support rapid open data sharing and rapid open access to surveillance and outbreak data. As one of the novel features we plan to publish rapid or even real-time surveillance reports and open data. The methods and description of the surveillance system may be peer-reviewed and published only once in detail, in a  "baseline report" (in a JMIR Res Protoc or a JMIR Public Health & Surveill paper), and authors then have the possibility to publish data and reports in frequent intervals rapidly and with only minimal additional peer-review (we call this article type "Rapid Surveillance Reports"). JMIR Publications may even work with authors/researchers and developers of selected surveillance systems on APIs for semi-automated reports (e.g. weekly reports to be automatically published in JPHS and indexed in PubMed, based on data-feeds from surveillance systems and minimal narratives and abstracts).

Furthermore, during epidemics and public health emergencies, submissions with critical data will be processed with expedited peer-review to enable publication within days or even in real-time.

We also publish descriptions of open data resources and open source software. Where possible, we can and want to publish or even host the actual software or dataset on the journal website.

Recent Articles

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Prevention and Health Promotion

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection. HPV can infect both females and males, and it can cause many cancers, including anal, cervical, vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers. HPV vaccination rates are lower than vaccination rates within other national vaccination programs, despite its importance. Research literature indicates that people obtain health-related information from internet sources and social media; however, the association between such health-seeking behavior on social media and HPV-related behaviors has not been consistently demonstrated in the literature.

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HIV/AIDS/STI Prevention and Care

Poverty and social inequality exacerbate HIV risk among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) in sub-Saharan Africa. Cash transfers can influence the structural determinants of health, thereby reducing HIV risk.

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Statistical Methods for Surveillance and Population Health

Surveillance data are essential public health resources for guiding policy and allocation of human and capital resources. These data often consist of large collections of information based on nonrandom sample designs. Population estimates based on such data may be impacted by the underlying sample distribution compared to the true population of interest. In this study, we simulate a population of interest and allow response rates to vary in nonrandom ways to illustrate and measure the effect this has on population-based estimates of an important public health policy outcome.

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Surveillance Systems

Hand transcribing nutrient composition data from websites requires extensive human resources and is prone to error. As a result, there are limited nutrient composition data on food prepared out of the home in the United Kingdom. Such data are crucial for understanding and monitoring the out-of-home food environment, which aids policy making. Automated data collection from publicly available sources offers a potential low-resource solution to address this gap.

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Outbreak and Pandemic Preparedness and Management

Pandemic fatigue is defined as feelings of demotivation to follow preventive measures against COVID-19, together with decreased trust in government and frequency of information-seeking behaviors.

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Statistical Methods for Surveillance and Population Health

Data anonymization and sharing have become popular topics for individuals, organizations, and countries worldwide. Open-access sharing of anonymized data containing sensitive information about individuals makes the most sense whenever the utility of the data can be preserved and the risk of disclosure can be kept below acceptable levels. In this case, researchers can use the data without access restrictions and limitations.

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Infoveillance, Infodemiology, Digital Disease Surveillance, Infodemic Management

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is recommended for adolescents and young adults to prevent HPV-related cancers and genital warts. However, HPV vaccine uptake among the target age groups is suboptimal.

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Health Services in Resource-Poor Settings and LMICs

Effective health policy formulation requires sound information of the numerical data and causes of deaths in a population. Currently, in Bangladesh, neither births nor deaths are fully and promptly registered. Birth registration in Bangladesh is around 54% nationally. Although the legal requirements are to register within 45 days of an event, only 4.5% of births and 35.9% of deaths were reported within the required time frame in 2020. This study adopted an innovative digital notification approach to improve the coverage of registration of these events at the community level.

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Infoveillance, Infodemiology, Digital Disease Surveillance, Infodemic Management

Adding additional bicycle and pedestrian paths to an area can lead to improved health outcomes for residents over time. However, quantitatively determining which areas benefit more from bicycle and pedestrian paths, how many miles of bicycle and pedestrian paths are needed, and the health outcomes that may be most improved remain open questions.

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Descriptive Epidemiology and Population Size Estimates

Acute gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses are of the most common problems evaluated by physicians and some of the most preventable. There is evidence of GI pathogen transmission when people are in close contact. The COVID-19 pandemic led to the sudden implementation of widespread social distancing measures in the United States. There is strong evidence that social distancing measures impact the spread of SARS-CoV-2, and a growing body of research indicates that these measures also decrease the transmission of other respiratory pathogens.

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Surveillance Systems

Injury is an increasingly pressing global health issue. An effective surveillance system is required to monitor the trends and burden of injuries.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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