JMIR Public Health and Surveillance

A multidisciplinary journal that focuses on the intersection of public health and technology, public health informatics, mass media campaigns, surveillance, participatory epidemiology, and innovation in public health practice and research

Editor-in-Chief:

Travis Sanchez, DVM, MPH, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, USA


Impact Factor 14.56

JMIR Public Health & Surveillance (JPHS, Editor-in-chief: Travis Sanchez, Emory University/Rollins School of Public Health) is a top-ranked (Q1) Clarivate (SCIE, SSCI etc), ScopusPMC/PubMed- and MEDLINE-indexed, peer-reviewed international multidisciplinary journal with a unique focus on the intersection of innovation and technology in public health, and includes topics like public health informatics, surveillance (surveillance systems and rapid reports), participatory epidemiology, infodemiology and infoveillance, digital disease detection, digital epidemiology, electronic public health interventions, mass media/social media campaigns, health communication, and emerging population health analysis systems and tools. In June 2022, JPHS received an impact factor of 14.56.

JPHS has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

We publish regular articles, reviews, protocols/system descriptions and viewpoint papers on all aspects of public health, with a focus on innovation and technology in public health. The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

Apart from publishing traditional public health research and viewpoint papers as well as reports from traditional surveillance systems, JPH was one of the first (if not the only) peer-reviewed journals to publish papers with surveillance or pharmacovigilance data from non-traditional, unstructured big data and text sources such as social media and the Internet (infoveillance, digital disease detection), or reports on novel participatory epidemiology projects, where observations are solicited from the public.  

Among other innovations, JPHS is also dedicated to support rapid open data sharing and rapid open access to surveillance and outbreak data. As one of the novel features we plan to publish rapid or even real-time surveillance reports and open data. The methods and description of the surveillance system may be peer-reviewed and published only once in detail, in a  "baseline report" (in a JMIR Res Protoc or a JMIR Public Health & Surveill paper), and authors then have the possibility to publish data and reports in frequent intervals rapidly and with only minimal additional peer-review (we call this article type "Rapid Surveillance Reports"). JMIR Publications may even work with authors/researchers and developers of selected surveillance systems on APIs for semi-automated reports (e.g. weekly reports to be automatically published in JPHS and indexed in PubMed, based on data-feeds from surveillance systems and minimal narratives and abstracts).

Furthermore, during epidemics and public health emergencies, submissions with critical data will be processed with expedited peer-review to enable publication within days or even in real-time.

We also publish descriptions of open data resources and open source software. Where possible, we can and want to publish or even host the actual software or dataset on the journal website.

Recent Articles

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COVID-19 Vaccination

The success of pediatric COVID-19 vaccination strongly depends on parents' willingness to vaccinate their children. To date, the role of socioeconomic position (SEP) in pediatric COVID-19 vaccination has not been thoroughly examined.

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COVID-19 Vaccination

The COVID-19 booster vaccination rate has declined despite the wide availability of vaccines. As COVID-19 is becoming endemic and charges for regular booster vaccination are being introduced, measuring public acceptance and the willingness to pay for regular COVID-19 boosters is ever more crucial.

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Surveillance Systems

Disease surveillance systems capable of producing accurate real-time and short-term forecasts can help public health officials design timely public health interventions to mitigate the effects of disease outbreaks in affected populations. In France, existing clinic-based disease surveillance systems produce gastroenteritis activity information that lags real time by 1 to 3 weeks. This temporal data gap prevents public health officials from having a timely epidemiological characterization of this disease at any point in time and thus leads to the design of interventions that do not take into consideration the most recent changes in dynamics.

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Violence including Domestic Violence/Abuse

Sexual violence against women is prevalent worldwide. Prevention programs that treat men as allies and integrate a bystander framework are emerging in lower income settings, but evidence of their effectiveness is conflicting.

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Infoveillance, Infodemiology, Digital Disease Surveillance, Infodemic Management

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications are frequently used to self-care for nonspecific ovarian cancer symptoms prior to diagnosis. Monitoring such purchases may provide an opportunity for earlier diagnosis.

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Behavioural Surveillance for Public Health

Risky sexual behavior (RSB), the most direct risk factor for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), is common among college students. Thus, identifying relevant risk factors and predicting RSB are important to intervene and prevent RSB among college students.

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Outbreak and Pandemic Preparedness and Management

Telehealth has been widely used for new case detection and telemonitoring during the COVID-19 pandemic. It safely provides access to health care services and expands assistance to remote, rural areas and underserved communities in situations of shortage of specialized health professionals. Qualified data are systematically collected by health care workers containing information on suspected cases and can be used as a proxy of disease spread for surveillance purposes. However, the use of this approach for syndromic surveillance has yet to be explored. Besides, the mathematical modeling of epidemics is a well-established field that has been successfully used for tracking the spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection, supporting the decision-making process on diverse aspects of public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The response of the current models depends on the quality of input data, particularly the transmission rate, initial conditions, and other parameters present in compartmental models. Telehealth systems may feed numerical models developed to model virus spread in a specific region.

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Environmental Health

Particulate matter (PM) is detrimental to the respiratory and circulatory systems. However, no study has evaluated the lag effects of weekly exposure to fine PM during the period from preconception to delivery on the risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDPs).

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Theme Issue: Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak Rapid Reports

The global COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately affected Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) and revealed significant health disparities with reports of increased discrimination and xenophobia. Among AAPIs, the pandemic exacerbated their social, linguistic, and geographic isolation. Social support may be especially important for AAPIs given the salience of collectivism as a cultural value. Another mechanism for support among AAPIs was technology use, as it is generally widespread among this population. However, older adults may not perceive the same benefits.

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Digital Contact Tracing, Digital Proximity Tracing, Precision Public Health

Digital surveillance tools and health informatics show promise in counteracting diseases but have limited uptake. A notable illustration of the limits of such tools is the general failure of digital contact tracing in the United States in response to COVID-19.

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Theme Issue: Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak Rapid Reports

The COVID-19 pandemic has created devastating health, social, economic, and political effects that will have long-lasting impacts. Public health efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 are the priority of national policies for responding to the pandemic globally. Public health and social measures (PHSMs) have been shown to be effective when used alone or in combination with other measures, reducing the risk of spreading COVID-19. However, there is insufficient evidence on the status of compliance with PHSMs in the general population for the prevention of COVID-19 in public areas, including Korea.

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