JMIR Public Health and Surveillance

A multidisciplinary journal that focuses on the intersection of public health and technology, public health informatics, mass media campaigns, surveillance, participatory epidemiology, and innovation in public health practice and research.

Editor-in-Chief:

Travis Sanchez, DVM, MPH, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, USA


Impact Factor 3.5 CiteScore 13.7

JMIR Public Health & Surveillance (JPHS, Editor-in-chief: Travis Sanchez, Emory University/Rollins School of Public Health) is a top-ranked (Q1) Clarivate (SCIE, SSCI etc), ScopusPMC/PubMedMEDLINE, CABI, and EBSCO/EBSCO essentials indexed, peer-reviewed international multidisciplinary journal with a unique focus on the intersection of innovation and technology in public health, and includes topics like public health informatics, surveillance (surveillance systems and rapid reports), participatory epidemiology, infodemiology and infoveillance, digital disease detection, digital epidemiology, electronic public health interventions, mass media/social media campaigns, health communication, and emerging population health analysis systems and tools. In June 2024, JPHS received an impact factor of 3.5. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance received a CiteScore of 13.7, placing it in the 97th percentile (#18 of 665) as a Q1 journal in the field of Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health.

JPHS has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

We publish regular articles, reviews, protocols/system descriptions and viewpoint papers on all aspects of public health, with a focus on innovation and technology in public health. The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

Apart from publishing traditional public health research and viewpoint papers as well as reports from traditional surveillance systems, JPH was one of the first (if not the only) peer-reviewed journals to publish papers with surveillance or pharmacovigilance data from non-traditional, unstructured big data and text sources such as social media and the Internet (infoveillance, digital disease detection), or reports on novel participatory epidemiology projects, where observations are solicited from the public.  

Among other innovations, JPHS is also dedicated to support rapid open data sharing and rapid open access to surveillance and outbreak data. As one of the novel features we plan to publish rapid or even real-time surveillance reports and open data. The methods and description of the surveillance system may be peer-reviewed and published only once in detail, in a  "baseline report" (in a JMIR Res Protoc or a JMIR Public Health & Surveill paper), and authors then have the possibility to publish data and reports in frequent intervals rapidly and with only minimal additional peer-review (we call this article type "Rapid Surveillance Reports"). JMIR Publications may even work with authors/researchers and developers of selected surveillance systems on APIs for semi-automated reports (e.g. weekly reports to be automatically published in JPHS and indexed in PubMed, based on data-feeds from surveillance systems and minimal narratives and abstracts).

Furthermore, during epidemics and public health emergencies, submissions with critical data will be processed with expedited peer-review to enable publication within days or even in real-time.

We also publish descriptions of open data resources and open source software. Where possible, we can and want to publish or even host the actual software or dataset on the journal website.

Recent Articles

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Cross-Sectional Studies in Public Health

Vaccination plays an important role in preventing COVID-19 infection and reducing the severity of the disease. There are usually differences in vaccination rates between urban and rural areas. Measuring these differences can aid in developing more coordinated and sustainable solutions. This information also serves as a reference for the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases in the future.

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Behavioural Surveillance for Public Health

Rural underserved areas facing health disparities have unequal access to health resources. By the third and fourth waves of SARS-CoV-2 infections in the United States, COVID-19 testing has reduced with more reliance on home testing, and those seeking testing are largely symptomatic.

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Health Services in Resource-Poor Settings and LMICs

Maternal and perinatal health are fundamental to human development. However, in low-resource settings such as sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), significant challenges persist in reducing maternal, newborn, and child mortality. To achieve the targets of the sustainable development goal 3 (SDG3) and universal health coverage (UHC), improving access to continuous maternal and perinatal health care services (CMPHS) has been addressed as a critical strategy.

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Longitudinal and Cohort Studies in Public Health

Multimorbidity is a significant public health concern, characterized by the coexistence and interaction of multiple preexisting medical conditions. This complex condition has been associated with an increased risk of COVID-19. Individuals with multimorbidity who contract COVID-19 often face a significant reduction in life expectancy. The postpandemic period has also highlighted an increase in frailty, emphasizing the importance of integrating existing multimorbidity details into epidemiological risk assessments. Managing clinical data that include medical histories presents significant challenges, particularly due to the sparsity of data arising from the rarity of multimorbidity conditions. Also, the complex enumeration of combinatorial multimorbidity features introduces challenges associated with combinatorial explosions.

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Prevention and Health Promotion

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most deadly form of cancer, inducing an estimated 1.9 million incidence cases and 0.9 million deaths worldwide in 2020. Despite the availability of screening tests, their uptake remains suboptimal. However, blood-based tests that look for signs of cancer-specific markers in the body are increasingly available as an alternative for more invasive tests for cancer. Compared with existing tests, the benefits of blood-based tests for CRC include not needing pretest preparation, stool handling, and dietary or medication restrictions.

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Prevention and Health Promotion

The association between lifestyle risk factors and the risk of mortality and chronic diseases has been established, while limited research has explored the impact of healthy lifestyle factors on lifetime health care expenditure using longitudinal individual data.

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Participatory Epidemiology and Surveillance

Cholera-like diarrheal disease (CLDD) outbreaks are complex and influenced by environmental factors, socioeconomic conditions, and population dynamics, leading to limitations in traditional surveillance methods. In Malawi, cholera is considered an endemic disease. Its epidemiological profile is characterized by seasonal patterns, often coinciding with the rainy season when contamination of water sources is more likely. However, the outbreak that began in March 2022 has extended to the dry season, with deaths reported in all 29 districts. It is considered the worst outbreak in the past 10 years.

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Public Health Informatics

Adverse events associated with vaccination have been evaluated by epidemiological studies and more recently have gained additional attention with the emergency use authorization of several COVID-19 vaccines. As part of its responsibility to conduct postmarket surveillance, the US Food and Drug Administration continues to monitor several adverse events of special interest (AESIs) to ensure vaccine safety, including for COVID-19.

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COVID-19 Vaccination

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has had a profound impact worldwide, leading to widespread morbidity and mortality. Vaccination against COVID-19 is a critical tool in controlling the spread of the virus and reducing the severity of the disease. However, the rapid development and deployment of COVID-19 vaccines have raised concerns about potential adverse events following immunization (AEFIs). Understanding the temporal and spatial patterns of these AEFIs is crucial for an effective public health response and vaccine safety monitoring.

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COVID-19 Vaccination

With the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants that eluded immunity from vaccines and prior infections, vaccine shortages and their effectiveness pose unprecedented challenges for governments to expand booster vaccination programs. Fractionation of vaccine doses might be an effective strategy to help society to face these challenges, which may have comparable efficacies in contrast with the standard doses.

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COVID-19 Vaccination

With the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants that eluded immunity from vaccines and prior infections, vaccine shortages and their effectiveness pose unprecedented challenges for governments to expand booster vaccination programs. Fractionation of vaccine doses might be an effective strategy to help society to face these challenges, which may have comparable efficacies in contrast with the standard doses.

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