JMIR Public Health and Surveillance

A multidisciplinary journal that focuses on the intersection of public health and technology, public health informatics, mass media campaigns, surveillance, participatory epidemiology, and innovation in public health practice and research.

Editor-in-Chief:

Travis Sanchez, DVM, MPH, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, USA


Impact Factor 3.5 CiteScore 13.7

JMIR Public Health & Surveillance (JPHS, Editor-in-chief: Travis Sanchez, Emory University/Rollins School of Public Health) is a top-ranked (Q1) Clarivate (SCIE, SSCI etc), ScopusPMC/PubMedMEDLINE, CABI, and EBSCO/EBSCO essentials indexed, peer-reviewed international multidisciplinary journal with a unique focus on the intersection of innovation and technology in public health, and includes topics like public health informatics, surveillance (surveillance systems and rapid reports), participatory epidemiology, infodemiology and infoveillance, digital disease detection, digital epidemiology, electronic public health interventions, mass media/social media campaigns, health communication, and emerging population health analysis systems and tools. In June 2024, JPHS received an impact factor of 3.5. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance received a CiteScore of 13.7, placing it in the 97th percentile (#18 of 665) as a Q1 journal in the field of Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health.

JPHS has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

We publish regular articles, reviews, protocols/system descriptions and viewpoint papers on all aspects of public health, with a focus on innovation and technology in public health. The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

Apart from publishing traditional public health research and viewpoint papers as well as reports from traditional surveillance systems, JPH was one of the first (if not the only) peer-reviewed journals to publish papers with surveillance or pharmacovigilance data from non-traditional, unstructured big data and text sources such as social media and the Internet (infoveillance, digital disease detection), or reports on novel participatory epidemiology projects, where observations are solicited from the public.  

Among other innovations, JPHS is also dedicated to support rapid open data sharing and rapid open access to surveillance and outbreak data. As one of the novel features we plan to publish rapid or even real-time surveillance reports and open data. The methods and description of the surveillance system may be peer-reviewed and published only once in detail, in a  "baseline report" (in a JMIR Res Protoc or a JMIR Public Health & Surveill paper), and authors then have the possibility to publish data and reports in frequent intervals rapidly and with only minimal additional peer-review (we call this article type "Rapid Surveillance Reports"). JMIR Publications may even work with authors/researchers and developers of selected surveillance systems on APIs for semi-automated reports (e.g. weekly reports to be automatically published in JPHS and indexed in PubMed, based on data-feeds from surveillance systems and minimal narratives and abstracts).

Furthermore, during epidemics and public health emergencies, submissions with critical data will be processed with expedited peer-review to enable publication within days or even in real-time.

We also publish descriptions of open data resources and open source software. Where possible, we can and want to publish or even host the actual software or dataset on the journal website.

Recent Articles

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GIS (Geographic Information Systems) Applications in Public Health and Spatial Epidemiology

The relation between climate change and human health has become one of the major worldwide public health issues. However, the evidence for low-latitude plateau regions is limited, where the climate is unique and diverse with a complex geography and topography.

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Surveillance Systems

South Korea has implemented hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) surveillance systems since 2009 to monitor incidence trends and identify disease burden. This nationwide surveillance involves a network of approximately 100 pediatric clinics that report all probable and confirmed HFMD cases. Following the COVID-19 pandemic, infectious disease surveillance systems must be evaluated to ensure the effective use of limited public health resources.

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HIV/AIDS/STI Prevention and Care

Sexual transmission among men who have sex with men(MSM) has become the major HIV transmission route. However, limited research has been conducted to investigate the association between transactional sex(TS) and HIV incidence in China.

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Open Source and Data for Public Health

Infectious disease (ID) cohorts are key to advancing public health surveillance, public policies, and pandemic responses. Unfortunately, ID cohorts often lack funding to store and share clinical-epidemiological (CE) data and high-dimensional laboratory (HDL) data long term, which is evident when the link between these data elements is not kept up to date. This becomes particularly apparent when smaller cohorts fail to successfully address the initial scientific objectives due to limited case numbers, which also limits the potential to pool these studies to monitor long-term cross-disease interactions within and across populations. CE data from 9 arbovirus (arthropod-borne viruses) cohorts in Latin America were retrospectively harmonized using the Maelstrom Research methodology and standardized to Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). We created a harmonized and standardized meta-cohort that contains CE and HDL data from 9 arbovirus studies from Latin America. To facilitate advancements in cross-population inference and reuse of cohort data, the Reconciliation of Cohort Data for Infectious Diseases (ReCoDID) Consortium harmonized and standardized CE and HDL from 9 arbovirus cohorts into 1 meta-cohort. Interested parties will be able to access data dictionaries that include information on variables across the data sets via Bio Studies. After consultation with each cohort, linked harmonized and curated human cohort data (CE and HDL) will be made accessible through the European Genome-phenome Archive platform to data users after their requests are evaluated by the ReCoDID Data Access Committee. This meta-cohort can facilitate various joint research projects (eg, on immunological interactions between sequential flavivirus infections and for the evaluation of potential biomarkers for severe arboviral disease).

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Vaccination and Immunization in the Digital Age

To address the global challenge of vaccine hesitancy, the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization strongly promotes vaccination reminder and recall interventions. Coupled with the new opportunities presented by scientific advancements, these measures are crucial for successfully immunizing target population groups.

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General Articles on Innovation and Technology in Public Health

The global impact of climate change ranges from intense heatwaves to extreme weather events that endanger entire ecosystems and people’s way of life. Adverse climate change events place undue stress on food and health systems, with consequences for human food security and mental health status. Ubiquitous digital devices, such as smartphones, have the potential to manage existing and emerging climate-related crises, given their ability to enable rapid response, instant communication, and knowledge sharing.

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Public Health Policy

In South Korea, the cancer incidence rate has increased by 56.5% from 2001 to 2021. Nevertheless, the 5-year cancer survival rate from 2017 to 2021 increased by 17.9% compared with that from 2001 to 2005. Cancer survival rates tend to decline with lower socioeconomic status, and variations exist in the survival rates among different cancer types. Analyzing socioeconomic patterns in the survival of cancer patients can help identify high-risk groups and ensure that they benefit from interventions.

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Innovative Methods in Public Health and Surveillance

Prescribed contraception is used worldwide by over 400 million women of reproductive age. Monitoring contraceptive use is a major public health issue that usually relies on population-based surveys. However, these surveys are conducted on average every 6 years and do not allow close follow-up of contraceptive use. Moreover, their sample size is often too limited for the study of specific population subgroups such as people with low income. Health administrative data could be an innovative and less costly source to study contraceptive use.

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Cross-Sectional Studies in Public Health

Vaccination plays an important role in preventing COVID-19 infection and reducing the severity of the disease. There are usually differences in vaccination rates between urban and rural areas. Measuring these differences can aid in developing more coordinated and sustainable solutions. This information also serves as a reference for the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases in the future.

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Behavioural Surveillance for Public Health

Rural underserved areas facing health disparities have unequal access to health resources. By the third and fourth waves of SARS-CoV-2 infections in the United States, COVID-19 testing has reduced with more reliance on home testing, and those seeking testing are largely symptomatic.

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Health Services in Resource-Poor Settings and LMICs

Maternal and perinatal health are fundamental to human development. However, in low-resource settings such as sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), significant challenges persist in reducing maternal, newborn, and child mortality. To achieve the targets of the sustainable development goal 3 (SDG3) and universal health coverage (UHC), improving access to continuous maternal and perinatal health care services (CMPHS) has been addressed as a critical strategy.

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