Search Articles

View query in Help articles search

Search Results (1 to 10 of 12613 Results)

Download search results: END BibTex RIS


Consensus on Use of the Term “App” Versus “Application” for Reporting of mHealth Research

Consensus on Use of the Term “App” Versus “Application” for Reporting of mHealth Research

Thomas Lorchan Lewis, Matthew Alexander Boissaud-Cooke, Timothy Dy Aungst A graph showing cumulative number of Pub Med search results by year since 1975 for keywords related to mobile applications (search carried out on April 7, 2014).

Thomas Lorchan Lewis, Matthew Alexander Boissaud-Cooke, Timothy Dy Aungst, Gunther Eysenbach

J Med Internet Res 2014;16(7):e174


The Impact of Search Engine Selection and Sorting Criteria on Vaccination Beliefs and Attitudes: Two Experiments Manipulating Google Output

The Impact of Search Engine Selection and Sorting Criteria on Vaccination Beliefs and Attitudes: Two Experiments Manipulating Google Output

Jonckheere’s test revealed a significant trend in the data: the more participants were exposed to antivaccination websites, the lower the median of knowledge (J=4783.5, z=−2.142, P=.03).

Ahmed Allam, Peter Johannes Schulz, Kent Nakamoto

J Med Internet Res 2014;16(4):e100


Measuring the Lifespace of People With Parkinson’s Disease Using Smartphones: Proof of Principle

Measuring the Lifespace of People With Parkinson’s Disease Using Smartphones: Proof of Principle

data could differentiate between people with PD and the control group, and (2) to explore whether symptom severity in PD relates to Lifespace measured by GPS.Methods Source of the Data Data used in the preparation of this article were obtained from the Michael J

Jacki Liddle, David Ireland, Simon J McBride, Sandra G Brauer, Leanne M Hall, Hang Ding, Mohan Karunanithi, Paul W Hodges, Deborah Theodoros, Peter A Silburn, Helen J Chenery

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2014;2(1):e13


Prospective Epidemiological Research on Functioning Outcomes Related to Major Depressive Disorder in Japan (PERFORM-J): Protocol for a Prospective Cohort Study

Prospective Epidemiological Research on Functioning Outcomes Related to Major Depressive Disorder in Japan (PERFORM-J): Protocol for a Prospective Cohort Study

To increase awareness of cognitive dysfunction in depression in Japan, we have designed a prospective observational study (PERFORM-J; UMIN Clinical Trials Registry: UMIN000024320), based on the original PERFORM study.

Tomiki Sumiyoshi, Koichiro Watanabe, Shinichi Noto, Shigeru Sakamoto, Yoshiya Moriguchi, Shuichi Okamoto

JMIR Res Protoc 2018;7(6):e161